Research and Scholarship

Burnout, Workplace Factors, and Intent to Leave Among Hematology/Oncology Nurse Practitioners

Laura Bourdeanu,(1) NP, PhD, Qiuping (Pearl) Zhou,(2) PhD, RN, Michelle DeSamper,(3) Kaitlin Anne Pericak,(4) MA, and Arlene Pericak,(2) FNP-BC, DA

From (1)American Sentinel University, Aurora, Colorado; (2)George Washington University School of Nursing, Washington, DC; (3)University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida; (4)University of Miami, Miami, Florida

Authors’ disclosures of conflicts of interest are found at the end of this article.

Correspondence to: Laura Bourdeanu, NP, PhD, American Sentinel University, 2260 South Xanadu Way, Aurora, CO 80014. E-mail: laura.bourdeanu@americansentinel.edu


J Adv Pract Oncol 2020;11(2):141–148 | https://doi.org/10.6004/jadpro.2020.11.2.2 | © 2020 Harborside™


  

ABSTRACT

Background: Burnout and intent to leave have been well documented in oncology/hematology health-care professionals, with a potentially detrimental effect on the patient-provider relationship and job satisfaction. With the recommended changes in the nurse practitioner (NP) role to accommodate for the physician shortage, it is important to determine the burnout and intent to leave of hematology/oncology NPs. Purpose: To examine the association between burnout, workplace factors, and intent to leave among hematology/oncology NPs. Methods: In this cross-sectional survey, a convenience sample of 201 hematology/oncology NPs was recruited to assess their burnout levels using the Maslach Burnout Inventory, workplace factors using the Areas of Worklife survey (AWS), and intent to leave. Descriptive, correlational, and logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the relationships among variables. Results: 44 (21.9%) participants reported intention to leave the profession or hematology/oncology. 30.8% of the sample reported a high level of emotional exhaustion, 9.0% reported high depersonalization, and 21.0% reported low personal accomplishment. Emotional exhaustion was related to increased likelihood of intent to leave in regression model (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05–1.17, p < .001). Workplace reward (adjusted OR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.17–0.93, p < .05) and value (adjusted OR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.28–0.99, p < .05) were negatively associated with intent to leave. Conclusion: Hematology/oncology NPs experience high emotional exhaustion, with over 20% indicating intent to leave their job or the nursing profession. Some workplace factors may play protective roles to reduce the intent to leave. Interventions are needed to enhance these workplace factors to decrease burnout.




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